Why I Love Landscape Photography in the Rain for Better Photos

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If you’re out taking landscape photographs and it starts to rain, your first inclination will probably be to bolt for the car. However, I want to encourage everyone to brace for a long day out in the rain because rain helps you take better landscape photos.

You may not be convinced right away unless you have really great rain gear, but there are several reasons why rain will benefit your photography. Let me run down the list for you.

First off, there will be way less people around when it’s raining. Think back to your first inclination you would have as the rain drops started to fall. Everyone (well except for you) will sprint back to their cars or shelters as fast as possible. This is a tremendous opportunity for you to shoot amazing landscapes will no people in the frame. I know we should share locations, but there are times that people ruin my shots. That is why I feel warm and fuzzy inside when I’m the only person left standing in the rain with all the nature to myself.

So, you’re out in nature alone in the rain… what do you shoot? The answer you are looking for is waterfalls. Waterfalls require a long exposure that don’t reveal the raindrops that fall, but instead will reveal silky smooth moving water. If you use a circular polarizer, you can even reveal rocks and leaves that are under the surface of the water. Even more, the rain increases the amount of water that is in the river or stream which increases the water flow. More flow means that you have more opportunities for interesting foregrounds that you can capture with long exposures and creative compositions. Just be sure that whenever you’re shooting in the rain you have appropriate camera protection (all of my recommended rain gear is linked below.)

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Another reason to shoot in the rain is because it will reveal more interesting weather events. Fog can form, greens are more expressed and more vibrant, and passing clouds look wonderful with long exposures. Dramatic weather leads to better photos and soft, even light that is cast over the landscapes you shoot. Diffused light from cloud cover is wonderful for landscape photography, especially smaller landscapes like waterfall scenes.

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For more on this topic, watch this video from Great Smoky Mountains National Park on shooting effective landscape photography in rainy weather.

Camera protection gear for rain:

Peak Design Shell

Micro Fiber Cloths

Rocket Air Blaster

THE EDITING SOFTWARE I USE (LUMINAR 2018) (USE CODE “DAVID” FOR $10 OFF)

THE GEAR I USE:
THE ONLY DRONE YOU'LL EVER NEED
MY DO-IT-ALL CAMERA
THE LENS I USE FOR ALL THE ZOOMS
MY FAVORITE LENS EVER
MY TRUSTY TRIPOD SIDEKICK
MY OVERNIGHT CAMERA BAG
THE DAY PACK I USE
THE MIC I USE FOR CRISPY AUDIO
MY COMPUTER (NOT A MAC)

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David JohnstonComment