The Biggest Mistake in Waterfall Photography Composition

Waterfall photography seems easy, right?

I mean, all you really have to do is get your camera on a tripod with a slightly slower shutter speed and snap some falling water.

Boom, you have an epic waterfall photo.

Well, it may not be as easy as you think.

waterfall photography composition

Take the photo to the left for example.

I literally did just that to take this image and it came out decent.

The problem?

This is probably the same composition that every photographer takes at Poweskourt Waterfall.

The biggest mistake in waterfall photography composition is not trying to get a unique shot.

I am definitely guilty of this as I’ve brought images home several times only to wish that I had tried harder to get a better composition that reflected my style of photography.

To get a stronger composition for your waterfall photography, you must be sure to take multiple photos from different angles and perspectives of your subject.

Work your way around the waterfalls and find shapes, leading lines, and foregrounds that allow you to take unique images.

Here’s a video I made describing this exact topic from Powerskourt Waterfall in Ireland.

THE EDITING SOFTWARE I USE (LUMINAR 2018) (USE CODE “DAVID” FOR $10 OFF)

THE GEAR I USE:
THE ONLY DRONE YOU'LL EVER NEED
MY DO-IT-ALL CAMERA
THE LENS I USE FOR ALL THE ZOOMS
MY FAVORITE LENS EVER
MY TRUSTY TRIPOD SIDEKICK
MY OVERNIGHT CAMERA BAG
THE DAY PACK I USE
THE MIC I USE FOR CRISPY AUDIO
MY COMPUTER (NOT A MAC)

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David JohnstonComment